Freakonomics Meets Lyra

Freakonomics author Steven D. Levitt on reading The Golden Compass:

Earlier this month I asked readers what I should do to fill my post-Harry Potter void. I didn’t anticipate just how full of reading suggestions blog readers would be — 270 comments.Of the hundreds of books mentioned, I had to start somewhere, so I read The Golden Compass by Philip Pullman.

I can’t really say that I liked it. I had a hard time identifying with the hero, Lyra. I couldn’t really picture her in my mind, for starters. (Which got me thinking that maybe it helped me to like the Potter books because I had seen some of the movies first, and thus knew what the characters were supposed to look like.)

I found the whole discussion of “Dust” to be boring. Things happened too fast and too unrealistically in the book: somehow she can all of the sudden read some impossibly difficult instrument; she’s in trouble and then some lady appears out of nowhere who had been her wet nurse 13 years earlier and saves her not realizing who it is.

The only part I really liked was what she did to the undeserving bear king.

I bought the trilogy, but given my lack of imagination, maybe I better see the movie first before trying the second installment.

Steven D. Levitt on The Not-So-Golden Compass – Freakonomics – Opinion – New York Times Blog

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1 Comment

Filed under His Dark Materials

One response to “Freakonomics Meets Lyra

  1. prkcs

    I can easily handle people not liking books that I love, but I was pretty shocked by the comment: “maybe it helped me to like the Potter books because I had seen some of the movies first, and thus knew what the characters were supposed to look like.”

    I know that the writer later half pokes fun at himself for not having any imagination, but _wow_. To me, that quote is horrifying.

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