Book Trailer Project: Introducing the Project

To prepare for this first session I had found several book trailers that I felt would be good models for my students.  Like the the ones they would do these relied on images rather than live action, had only text to read and no voice overs, and were all books familiar to them.

I began with this one for Jack Gantos’ Dead End in Norvelt, a book I was reading aloud to them.

Student observations:

  • Not very long, but tells the story without giving it away.
  • Quotes from people about the books.
  • Make people want to read it.
  • Make it look intriguing.
  • Music gives a tone.
  • Short, but not complete sentences.

I followed this with a student-created trailer for Brian Selznick’s The Invention of Hugo Cabret (familiar to them all because of the recent movie).

Student observations:

  • Music was good for the book.
  • Very mysterious titles make you want to read.
  • Used art from the book to let you know a bit of what it is about.
  • Art matched the titles.
  • Ken Burns effect used well.
  • Maintained the black/white color of the book.
  • Questions about the book: What does it all mean?

Next came a video for Cat Valente’s The Girl Who Circumnavigated Fairyland. Cat had visited us recently and the children knew we were soon to begin a unit reading the book.

Student observations:

  • Very strong music. Lyrics are about the story. Mysterious.
  • Tone is gentle, but story is not (ironic).
  • Had a slightly more adult feel even though the audience is kids.
  • Object that was in every image — the key.
  • Some images moved (e..g the clouds).
  • Fairyland is indicated by music and images.

Next: Presenting to them my process in creating a book trailer and then setting them up to begin preparing for their own.

2 Comments

Filed under Book Trailer, In the Classroom

2 responses to “Book Trailer Project: Introducing the Project

  1. Can’t wait to see how this goes! I may try it next year with my kids!

    Like

  2. Pingback: Book trailer projects a valuable part of classroom instruction « Web 2.0 edu

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