Thoughts on Newbery: What I’d Like to See Honored a Week from Today

Next Monday morning the ALA Youth Media Awards will be announced. Many wonderful books came into the world this year, some receiving a great deal of attention while others were appreciated more quietly. And as is true for all the hardworking committee members, those charged with selecting the Newbery will have spent an enormous amount of time considering the eligible titles before making their careful decision. (See this post for more about the criteria and their process.)

Because it is fun to see if any of your own favorites get the nod here are eight of mine. While there were many more I loved this year (including some on this list), based on recent conversations, hard thinking, and irrational feelings from the heart these are the ones I’d be preparing for the most if I were on this year’s committee.

  • El Deafo  This is probably a long shot, but I can dream, can’t I? My arguments for this wonderful graphic novel memoir are here.
  • West of the Moon Way back last March I wrote in my review, “Mixing fairy and folktale with harsh historical reality, Preus has created a gorgeous story of migration set in 19th century Norway.”
  • Brown Girl Dreaming  I wrote here that it is “One of the most lyrical and moving books of the year.”
  • The Key That Swallowed Joey Pigza  “By the time this final book of the series—as elegantly and propulsively written as the others—draws to a close, you know that no matter what the future holds, Joey’s inner strength and smart, sweet nature will prevail.” is how I concluded my starred Horn Book review.
  • The Madman of Piney Woods  In another starred Horn Book review, I wrote,” Curtis takes his young protagonists — and his readers — on a journey of revelation and insight. Woven throughout this profoundly moving yet also at times very funny novel are themes of family, friendship, community, compassion, and, fittingly, the power of words.”
  • The Crossover About this powerful verse novel, I wrote here, “The poetry is energetic and the story compelling — a sure-fire hit for a wide range of readers.”
  • The Family Romanov Of this elegant work of nonfiction I noted here, “Balancing the over-the-top lifestyle of the last Russian royals with firsthand accounts of the rest of the populace, Fleming provides a fascinating and highly readable version of this tragic story.”
  • The Fourteenth Goldfish In my New York Times review I wrote, “Youth, old age, life, death, love, possibilities and — oh yes — goldfish all come together in this warm, witty and wise novel.”

 

 

 

5 Comments

Filed under awards, Newbery

5 responses to “Thoughts on Newbery: What I’d Like to See Honored a Week from Today

  1. I would like to see El Deafo win, because I think it is the Most Distinguished Contribution to blah blah, but I still argue that it would be really difficult to separate the visual elements from the text.

    (Right now though, I’m mostly just hoping that the weather doesn’t delay my arrival in Chicago!)

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    • Yeah, but it would be so, so cool to see El Deafo there on Monday.

      Safe travels for all of you. (This horrible weather makes me a bit less sad that I won’t be there to see you all.)

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  2. Barry

    If BROWN GIRL DREAMING doesn’t sweep everything, it will be a travesty! I love EL DEAFO, and would be thrilled to see it get a medal (other than the Schneider, because that’s kind of a lock). But I’m also pulling for GREENGLASS HOUSE.

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  3. Ariel Cooke

    Pulling for Brown Girl Dreaming!

    Like

  4. Pingback: Thoughts on Newbery: The Day After (and El Deafo Redux) | educating alice

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