Learning About Africa: Sierra Leone, Mudslides, and Absent Media

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It is the rainy season in Sierra Leone. The country being close to the equator, these rains are intense and this year it has been worse than usual. Early on the morning of August 14th especially heavy rains caused dense flooding and then mudslides that killed hundreds and left hundreds more homeless in and around Freetown.

As soon as I heard of this I looked at my paper of record, The New York Times, and could find nothing when I searched. After a few hours there was a brief AP article. While I got my news of the disaster through other sources I continued to watch the Times because it showed what sort of priority they gave to this. Tweeted them to ask why not, but it made no difference. Eventually some articles appeared and have continued, but you have to look for them as they don’t show up on the front page or even in the World section of their app. (Here’s a good piece also wondering about the lack of world attention on this disaster: “400 dead. Hundreds missing. Where’s the world’s outcry for Sierra Leone’s mudslide victims?“)

Then, even more disturbing to me, my constant retweets and facebook shares of articles (from other news sources) were minimally retweeted, commented upon, or shared either. (My great thanks to those who did.) I’m not sure why not. Perhaps people just weren’t looking at these when they were posted. Perhaps facebook hides them if they are shares or retweets. I don’t know other than it reinforces my sense of how Africa simply doesn’t register in America. Why, why, why is this?

For those who don’t know much about what happened and is still happening in Sierra Leone here are some sources:

I was back in Freetown a few years ago, the first time since living there as a Peace Corps volunteer in the mid-70s, and spent time traveling with a former US ambassador who pointed out to me the deforestation (due to people needing wood to make charcoal), the out-of-control building on the hills impacting the watershed, and the huge increase of impoverished  inhabitants (who came during the war and never left) who have created new dense communities that are highly susceptible to any sort of disaster be it mudslides or Ebola. This is a vulnerable country that needs to be attended to. It is a country with strong historical connections to the US from the Gullah to the Amistad and more.

Horrible things are happening in the US right now. But horrible things are happening in other places too and we need to keep them in our thoughts too, learn about them, consider them, and remember them. It isn’t just the US. It isn’t just North America or Europe or Asia. It is the whole world.

I am a member of the Friends of Sierra Leone, a group consisting of former Peace Corps Volunteers like myself, Sierra Leonean nationals, and others who care about the country. We have a place for donations and you will see a note as to how the money is already on the ground with a local NGO doing good. The article, Sierra Leone Mudslides: How Can I Help?,  is an excellent article with links to various organizations doing good work in country.

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1 Comment

Filed under Africa, Sierra Leone

One response to “Learning About Africa: Sierra Leone, Mudslides, and Absent Media

  1. Philip Robinson

    Thanks for drawing the world’s attention to the recent happenings in Sierra Leone. The scant coverage of especially news about some parts of Africa is of old vintage. The BBC has always done a stellar job in the coverage of news in every nook and cranny of the world. As you mentioned there are strong ties between the US and Sierra Leone. I was a student of Peace Corp volunteers in the 1970s.They helped to mold me in my formative years and I am for ever grateful. Once again thanks for drawing the world’s and US attention to our corner of the world.

    Like

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